Registration for in-person and virtual attendance is available

ESC members should have received an Eblast with codes to enter to obtain their membership discount.  If you are a member, but have not received the Eblast, please contact info@esc-sec.ca.

To register, go to https://entsoc.org/events/annual-meeting/registration

 

 

 

On June 8th, we invite you to celebrate National Insect Appreciation Day (NAIAD) with thousands of insect enthusiasts, amateurs, and professionals all across Canada. We invite you to participate in the “insect picture challenge” on social media. This year, we invite professional entomologists to ‘lift a finger for insects’ by sharing their love of insects and arthropods with the public on social media by taking a picture or video of their species of study in their hand or on their finger. Share your love for insects!

In order to participate in the challenge, a person will have to post a least one picture of an insect during the National Insect Appreciation Day on June 8th. When posting the photo, the participant should include associated hashtags and nominate five friends by inviting them to also post an insect picture.

Hashtags: #InsectPictureChallenge #NationalinsectDay

How a hashtag works: A hashtag makes it possible for other users to easily find messages and post with a specific theme or content. Simply use the hashtag on social media (Facebook, Instagram or Twitter) and make sure that your photograph is public.

For more information, and to download resource material, go to: https://esc-sec.ca/entomology-resources/naiad-national-insect-appreciation-day/

 Sponsored by the Entomological Society of Canada (https://esc-sec.ca/)

The Science-Policy Committee in coordination with the Student and Early Professional Affairs Committee are excited to announce the second webinar in our webinar mini-series titled “Science Meets Policy”. Our second webinar will focus on the intersection of science and policy for entomology in working lands which will be held on Friday April 1st, 1:00-2:00 pm EDT. The goal of this webinar is to highlight key areas where science informs policy relevant to entomology in the forestry and agricultural sectors.

We have three very exciting panelists lined up to speak at this webinar. Each speaker will give a brief talk on their own experiences within the science-policy interface. We will then have time for a panel discussion and questions from attendees – so come prepared to ask questions!

For more information on this webinar click HERE

Please use the following zoom link to tune in on Friday April 1st at 1:00 pm EST

https://yorku.zoom.us/j/99651086483?pwd=bDlZMFNBcUFOWWppbHBPWjgxcUoxQT09

 

Webinar 1 – Insect Conservation

Friday March 4th, 2022, 1 – 2pm EST

Hello ESC members,

The Science-Policy Committee in coordination with the Student and Early Professional Affairs Committee are excited to announce our upcoming webinar mini-series titled “Science Meets Policy”. Our first webinar will focus on the intersection of science and policy in insect conservation which will be held on Friday March 4th, 1:00-2:00 pm EST. The goal of this webinar is to highlight key areas where science informs conservation policy relevant to entomologists.

We have three very exciting panelists lined up to speak at this webinar. Each speaker will give a brief talk on their own experiences within the science-policy interface. We will then have time for a panel discussion and questions from attendees – so come prepared to ask questions!

Download brochure here

Please use the following Zoom link to tune in on Friday March 4th at 1:00 pm EST

Topic: ESC Science-Policy Webinar I
Time: Mar 4, 2022 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting: https://yorku.zoom.us/j/92125773138?pwd=dEhpOXE1aWVJdHdtclN0Qk9FY3FZdz09

Meeting ID: 921 2577 3138
Passcode: 097795

One tap mobile:
+16473744685,,92125773138#,,,,*097795# Canada
+16475580588,,92125773138#,,,,*097795# Canada
Find your local number: https://yorku.zoom.us/u/ad8cEfIoBH
Join by SIP: 92125773138@zoomcrc.com

A new invasive weevil that is turning berry buds into duds in British Columbia

By Michelle Franklin, Paul Abram, and Tracy Hueppelsheuser

 

Most of the weevils we find in raspberry and strawberry fields in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia (BC) are nocturnal, so you would be hard pressed to find adult weevils without venturing out at night with your headlamp or flashlight.  However, in 2019 a curious small black weevil was observed during the day in a backyard raspberry patch in Abbotsford, BC.

The first specimens of this weevil were collected by Provincial Entomologist and coauthor, Tracy Hueppelsheuser from the BC Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries and sent to taxonomists and co-authors, Dr. Patrice Bouchard from the Canadian National Collection and Dr. Robert Anderson from the Canadian Museum of Nature for their expert identification. It turned out that this weevil was indeed new to the Fraser Valley, BC.  This tiny (2.5 – 3mm), black, long nosed weevil was the strawberry blossom weevil, Anthonomus rubi, which is native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This was the first observation of this species in North America.

Strawberry blossom weevil is not just a pest of strawberries.  It is able to feed and reproduce on a wide variety of plants in the family Rosaceae, including other economically important berry crops such as raspberries and blackberries.  Adult weevils overwinter in the leaf litter and become active in the spring.  After mating, the female chews a hole inside a closed flower bud, lays her egg inside, and then clips the stem below, killing the bud and preventing fruit development.  The weevil larva then develops inside the bud and emerges as an adult about a month later when temperatures are warm in the summer.  In its native range, the weevil  completes a single generation each year.

I started my position as a research scientist in July 2020, specializing in small fruit entomology and Integrated Pest Management at the Agassiz Research and Development Centre of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  With help from Paul Abram (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), Tracy Hueppelsheuser (BC Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries), and crop consulting company, ES Cropconsult we hit the ground running, completing surveys in the Fraser Valley in the summer 2020 to determine the distribution and associated host plants of the strawberry blossom weevil.  We found adult weevils on cultivated plants (e.g. strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, and rose) and wild hosts (e.g. salmonberry, thimbleberry, Himalayan blackberry, and wild rose).  Our survey found this species to be well established throughout the Fraser Valley from Richmond to Hope.

However, there is some good news for potential natural pest control.  Later during the summer we saw parasitoid wasps around weevil-damaged Himalayan blackberry buds.  We knew that some species of parasitoid wasps had the potential to be natural enemies of the weevil. Parasitoid wasps lay eggs on weevil larvae and their offspring often develop on the larvae resulting in their death. This behaviour has been successfully used as biological control of other weevil pests for decades. Hence, we initiated natural enemy surveys by collecting damaged buds from the field.  Although COVID protocols restricted lab access, I monitored damaged buds in my temporary laboratory (a.k.a home garage) and within a few weeks parasitoids emerged! Over the summer, we had over 150 parasitoids emerge from strawberry blossom weevil damaged buds. With the help of taxonomist and co-author, Dr. Gary Gibson from the Canadian National Collection, we identified the metallic-colored parasitoid to the genus Pteromalus. Future work is needed to identify the parasitoid to the species level, determine its origin (native to North America or inadvertently introduced from another continent), and determine its impact on strawberry blossom weevil populations.

I am continuing to work with my co-authors to understand the biology of this new pest and its natural enemies, with the goal of using this knowledge to develop sustainable pest management strategies in the future.  If you are interested in this new berry pest, please contact me at michelle.franklin@agr.gc.ca.

Free online access to article (until October 4, 2021): Click here

Links to information pages:

Strawberry blossom weevil – Anthonomus rubi Herbst – Canadian Food Inspection Agency (canada.ca)

Anthonomus rubi Detection in Canada Anthonomus rubi D tection au Canada | Phytosanitary Alert System (pestalerts.org)

Strawberry Blossom Weevil – Invasive Species Council of British Columbia (bcinvasives.ca)

Full article: https://doi.org/10.4039/tce.2021.28

2021 North American Forest Insect Work Conference

25-28 May 2021
Shaping Forests: Action in a Changing World

We are proud to announce that the final program has been published and is now available for your viewing pleasure!

Registration is now OPEN with early bird registration occurring until May 1!
Please visit the NAFIWC website to register!

Student Competition Judges: We are currently in search of nine judges for three sessions of student paper competitions all on Wednesday May 26th!
If you are able, please contact Kier Klepzig (kier.klepzig@jonesctr.org) or Rich Hofstetter (rich.hofstetter@nau.edu).

The NAFIWC 2021 Proceedings will be published as a USDA Forest Service General Technical Report, publicly available online. All presenters (talks and posters) are encouraged to submit a short synopsis of their work (1-3 pages maximum, including tables and figure as appropriate) for publication in the proceedings. Reports and abstracts will not be edited so please take care to provide a quality document. Please send submissions via email to Deepa Pureswaran at deepa.pureswaran@canada.ca by May 25. Submitted abstracts will be used lieu of synopses if not received by the deadline.

Check this site often, we will be announcing training sessions for virtual presentations for moderators and speakers soon!

Mark your calendars for Black in Entomology Week, happening virtually from Feb. 22-26. This is an event dedicated to celebrating and supporting Black entomologists, organized by Maydianne Andrade, Swanne Gordon, Vik Iyengar, Shakara Maggitt, Michelle Samuel-Foo, Jessica Ware, and Natasha Young.

The goals of #BlackInEnto week include fostering community among Black entomologists, including students and enthusiasts, for Black entomologists to inspire others and share their passion for insects (and other terrestrial arthropods), and to create funding opportunities for Black entomology students.

In addition to daily content on the @BlackInEnto twitter feed, there is a fantastic schedule of live panel discussions and social events on zoom. Some highlights include:

 

Tuesday Feb. 23

A panel on Black in Entomology with organizers Maydianne Andrade, Michelle Samuel-Foo, and Jessica Ware. This discussion will focus on the challenges and successes of Black entomologists, and ways everyone can get involved in efforts to diversify entomology and support Black entomologists. Hosted by the California Academy of Sciences. Watch here.

Plus, discussions about Entomology Careers, Getting into Undergraduate Research, and a community building social for non-traditional students. Full schedule here.

 

Wednesday Feb. 24

Panel discussion: Contributions of Black Entomologists to Insect Sciences. Hosted by Texas A&M University. Register here.

 

Thursday Feb. 24       

Panel discussion on Colonialism in Entomology, and an Entomology Trivia Night. Full schedule here.

 

Full schedules and registration links, profiles of Black Entomologists, and more can be found on the Black in Ento website here.

SEPTEMBER 14–19, 2020

This year BugFest, a North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences annual event, will go online. It will be a virtual infestation!  Join us as we interact with entomologists from North Carolina and around the world to learn about the fascinating world of bugs. We will have SIX days of buggy adventures as we celebrate our theme arthropod … THE FLY!

2020 THEME ARTHROPOD: FLIES!

BugFest 2020 Theme Days:

  • Mosquito Monday
  • Beneficial Tuesday
  • Art and Culture Wednesday
  • Entomophagy Thursday
  • Prime Crime Friday
  • BugFest Bugstravaganza Saturday

What’s in a name? BugFest celebrates all arthropods, a group that includes insects, spiders and scorpions, centipedes and millipedes, crayfish and crabs and many other creatures, as well as true bugs, like cicadas and planthoppers.

 For information and to register for programs visit https://naturalsciences.org/calendar/bugfest/programs/

On June 8th, we invite you to celebrate National Insect Appreciation Day (NAIAD) with thousands of insect enthusiasts, amateurs, and professionals all across Canada. This year, the in-person activities scheduled for NAIAD were canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, it will still be possible to participate in the “insect picture challenge” on social media. We hope that this challenge will prompt the public to develop their curiosity towards insects and raise awareness about the presence of insects all around us.

In order to participate in the challenge, a person will have to post a least one picture of an insect during the National Insect Appreciation Day on June 8th. When posting the photo, the participant should include associated hashtags and nominate five friends by inviting them to also post an insect picture.

Hashtags:
#InsectPictureChallenge
#NationalinsectDay