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Leonard, the insects and me

    Last winter, I spent a few months working on insect identifications for the BC Conservation Data Centre, mostly collections of insects made at newly-acquired conservation lands in the Okanagan and Kootenay regions of BC. As I had no laboratory of my own, and no reference collections to work with, I was working out of […]

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Leonard, the insects and me

    Last winter, I spent a few months working on insect identifications for the BC Conservation Data Centre, mostly collections of insects made at newly-acquired conservation lands in the Okanagan and Kootenay regions of BC. As I had no laboratory of my own, and no reference collections to work with, I was working out of […]

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Dangerous caterpillars

The following is a guest post by Emma DesPland Last week the CBC contacted me about an “infestation” of caterpillars near a local sports and community centre, citing parents’ concern that these could be dangerous for their children. I was surprised. The pine (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) and oak (T. processionea) processionary caterpillars do have a genuine […]

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Dangerous caterpillars

The following is a guest post by Emma DesPland Last week the CBC contacted me about an “infestation” of caterpillars near a local sports and community centre, citing parents’ concern that these could be dangerous for their children. I was surprised. The pine (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) and oak (T. processionea) processionary caterpillars do have a genuine […]

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The awesomeness of snakeflies

If you are a fan of Canadian neuropteroids, your bucket list should include a trip out west to see one of our best selling points: the Raphidioptera, or snakeflies. The most common of these are in the genus Agulla, and this morning I found several female Agulla when out for a walk at Mt. Tolmie […]

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The awesomeness of snakeflies

If you are a fan of Canadian neuropteroids, your bucket list should include a trip out west to see one of our best selling points: the Raphidioptera, or snakeflies. The most common of these are in the genus Agulla, and this morning I found several female Agulla when out for a walk at Mt. Tolmie […]