News

Hello JAM attendees!

Thank you so much for registering for the 2021 ESC/ESO JAM. Here are a few updates from the organizing committee.

  • Everyone who submitted a talk or a poster will be able to present at JAM.
  • Please visit https://www.entsocont.ca/esceso-2021-jam-english.html or https://www.entsocont.ca/esceso-2021-rac-franccedilais.html to see the JAM schedule. The schedule can also be downloaded directly here.
  • Our IT provider – Showcare – will reach out to speakers, and moderators to schedule speaker/moderator training within the coming weeks. Poster presenters will also be contacted with instructions about uploading their posters on the platform. All other attendees will receive an invitation for the conference website a week before the conference starts.
  • You can order your JAM 2021 T-shirts and hats here. Order now so you can wear your tees during the JAM in November! 🙂

Thanks, and we are looking forward to see you (virtually 🙂 in November!
Amro Zayed and Miriam Richards

(French follows)

This year, instead of the annual silent auction, the Student and Early Professional Affairs Committee of the Entomological Society of Canada is selling bandanas to raise money for the Annual Scholarship Fund.

This 100% cotton bandana, available in red or charcoal gray, is printed with the logo insects* of the ESC and all of the regional entomological societies, plus a bonus arctic wolf spider to represent the northern territories. The beautiful artwork is by Mary Capaldi, and you can find more of their work, much of it entomology-themed, here: https://linktr.ee/marycapaldi.

You can pre-order bandanas on Etsy or by contacting Catherine Scott by email or on twitter. We anticipate that the bandanas will be available for shipping around the time of the 2021 online annual meeting, in plenty of time for holiday gift-giving.

*list of featured taxa:

ESC – Grylloblatta campodeiformis
ESBC – Boreus elegans
ESAb – Apamea devastator
ESS – Melanoplus bivittatus
ESM – Cicindela formosa generosa
ESO – Danaus plexippus
SEQ – Limenitis arthemis arthemis
AES – Rhagoletis pomonella
Arctic wolf spider – Pardosa glacialis

Mockups of two bandanas featuring line drawings of insects and spiders. One is charcoal grey with white insects and the other is bright red with white insects.

Un bandana orné d’insectes pour soutenir les étudiants de la SEC

Cette année, au lieu des enchères silencieuses annuelles, le Comité des affaires étudiantes et des jeunes professionnels de la Société d’entomologie du Canada vend des bandanas pour amasser des fonds pour le Fonds des bourses de la SEC.

Ces bandanas sont faits de coton à 100%, sont disponibles en rouge ou gris anthracite, et ont des imprimés montrant les insectes* des logos de la SEC et de toutes les sociétés entomologiques régionales, en plus d’une lycose glaciale pour représenter les territoires. Cette belle œuvre d’art est de Mary Capaldi, et vous pouvez trouver davantage de ses œuvres, en grande partie sur le thème de l’entomologie, ici : https://linktr.ee/marycapaldi.

Vous pouvez précommander des bandanas sur Etsy ou en contactant Catherine Scott par courriel ou sur Twitter. Nous prévoyons que les bandanas seront prêts pour l’expédition au moment de la réunion annuelle en ligne de 2021, donc bien à temps pour offrir des cadeaux de Noël.

*liste des taxons représentés :

SEC – Grylloblatta campodeiformis
ESBC – Boreus elegans
ESAb – Apamea devastator
ESS – Melanoplus bivittatus
ESM – Cicindela formosa generosa
ESO – Danaus plexippus
SEQ – Limenitis arthemis arthemis
AES – Rhagoletis pomonella
Lycose glaciale – Pardosa glacialis

Folded bandana showing design including symbols representing all provincial and national entomological societies

From: The Canadian Phytopathological Society and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

To: All Canadian researchers in pest management

 Re: 2021 PEST MANAGEMENT RESEARCH REPORT – Insect Pests and Plant Diseases – CALL FOR REPORTS

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PUBLISHING RESULTS OF THE 2021 CROP YEAR FOR AUTHORS AND SECTION EDITORS

One of the objectives of the Pest Management Research Report (PMRR) is to facilitate the exchange of information on Integrated Pest Management (IPM) among persons involved in research and advisory services on IPM of insect pests and plant diseases of importance to the agri-food industry in Canada. To this end, the PMRR is published annually as a compilation of research reports by federal and provincial government, university and industry research and advisory personnel. These reports aid the development of recommendations for insect and disease management programs throughout Canada. They report on all aspects of pest management, including cultivar and management responses, and are available to support the registration of pest control products.

To increase the value of the report, everyone in Canada who is conducting studies involving pest management in agriculture is urged to report their results from 2021 in the format outlined in the attached guide (also available in French). The reports should ideally be 1-2 pages long and may be submitted in either French or English. Authors are requested to ensure they have the registrants’ approval to submit data about their products to a publicly available journal.

Because the Canadian Agricultural Insect Pest Review is no longer published, the PMRR now includes a section – Surveys and Outbreaks: Insects and Mites, to fill the information gap left by the loss of this annual publication. Results of field surveys to assess presence, abundance and distribution of new or established species can be reported in this section in the same format as for other reports in the PMRR. Reports of insect and mite outbreaks should include acreage of crop infested and location(s), control actions taken or product(s) used to minimize crop loss, crop loss assessment where possible, and results of control actions.

Full writing and submission instructions are here.

The 1995-2020 editions of the PMRR are available for viewing and download at http://phytopath.ca/publication/pmrr/.

You are cordially invited to a webinar by Dr. Jeffery K. Tomberlin from the Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, USA.

Janzen, Goff and Sheppard – Icons of Decomposition Ecology and Applied Outcomes: Where Are We Today?

Time 9.00 AM – 10.00 AM (GMT+8)
8.00 PM – 9.00 PM (GMT-5)
Date 29 September 2021 – Wednesday (GMT+8)
28 September 2021 – Tuesday (GMT-5)
Registration Free
Location Google Meet (https://meet.google.com/mpk-xdvi-tyz)

Youtube Live (https://youtu.be/NEdKwan6Bn8)

E-certificates will be provided.

You are kindly requested to click on the following link for registration https://forms.gle/P5cb1n5Y34f9ipK77

 We will send the information related to the webinar in the email that you provide.

Thank you.

Secretariat,
Fun Ento Lab International Webinar Series

Contact us via email fun.entolab@gmail.com for any inquiries related to the webinar.

A new invasive weevil that is turning berry buds into duds in British Columbia

By Michelle Franklin, Paul Abram, and Tracy Hueppelsheuser

 

Most of the weevils we find in raspberry and strawberry fields in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia (BC) are nocturnal, so you would be hard pressed to find adult weevils without venturing out at night with your headlamp or flashlight.  However, in 2019 a curious small black weevil was observed during the day in a backyard raspberry patch in Abbotsford, BC.

The first specimens of this weevil were collected by Provincial Entomologist and coauthor, Tracy Hueppelsheuser from the BC Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries and sent to taxonomists and co-authors, Dr. Patrice Bouchard from the Canadian National Collection and Dr. Robert Anderson from the Canadian Museum of Nature for their expert identification. It turned out that this weevil was indeed new to the Fraser Valley, BC.  This tiny (2.5 – 3mm), black, long nosed weevil was the strawberry blossom weevil, Anthonomus rubi, which is native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This was the first observation of this species in North America.

Strawberry blossom weevil is not just a pest of strawberries.  It is able to feed and reproduce on a wide variety of plants in the family Rosaceae, including other economically important berry crops such as raspberries and blackberries.  Adult weevils overwinter in the leaf litter and become active in the spring.  After mating, the female chews a hole inside a closed flower bud, lays her egg inside, and then clips the stem below, killing the bud and preventing fruit development.  The weevil larva then develops inside the bud and emerges as an adult about a month later when temperatures are warm in the summer.  In its native range, the weevil  completes a single generation each year.

I started my position as a research scientist in July 2020, specializing in small fruit entomology and Integrated Pest Management at the Agassiz Research and Development Centre of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  With help from Paul Abram (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), Tracy Hueppelsheuser (BC Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries), and crop consulting company, ES Cropconsult we hit the ground running, completing surveys in the Fraser Valley in the summer 2020 to determine the distribution and associated host plants of the strawberry blossom weevil.  We found adult weevils on cultivated plants (e.g. strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, and rose) and wild hosts (e.g. salmonberry, thimbleberry, Himalayan blackberry, and wild rose).  Our survey found this species to be well established throughout the Fraser Valley from Richmond to Hope.

However, there is some good news for potential natural pest control.  Later during the summer we saw parasitoid wasps around weevil-damaged Himalayan blackberry buds.  We knew that some species of parasitoid wasps had the potential to be natural enemies of the weevil. Parasitoid wasps lay eggs on weevil larvae and their offspring often develop on the larvae resulting in their death. This behaviour has been successfully used as biological control of other weevil pests for decades. Hence, we initiated natural enemy surveys by collecting damaged buds from the field.  Although COVID protocols restricted lab access, I monitored damaged buds in my temporary laboratory (a.k.a home garage) and within a few weeks parasitoids emerged! Over the summer, we had over 150 parasitoids emerge from strawberry blossom weevil damaged buds. With the help of taxonomist and co-author, Dr. Gary Gibson from the Canadian National Collection, we identified the metallic-colored parasitoid to the genus Pteromalus. Future work is needed to identify the parasitoid to the species level, determine its origin (native to North America or inadvertently introduced from another continent), and determine its impact on strawberry blossom weevil populations.

I am continuing to work with my co-authors to understand the biology of this new pest and its natural enemies, with the goal of using this knowledge to develop sustainable pest management strategies in the future.  If you are interested in this new berry pest, please contact me at michelle.franklin@agr.gc.ca.

Free online access to article (until October 4, 2021): Click here

Links to information pages:

Strawberry blossom weevil – Anthonomus rubi Herbst – Canadian Food Inspection Agency (canada.ca)

Anthonomus rubi Detection in Canada Anthonomus rubi D tection au Canada | Phytosanitary Alert System (pestalerts.org)

Strawberry Blossom Weevil – Invasive Species Council of British Columbia (bcinvasives.ca)

Full article: https://doi.org/10.4039/tce.2021.28

CONTACT THE SOCIETY

Association Coordinator: info@esc-sec.ca

ESC President: ESCPresident@esc-sec.ca

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