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The Canadian Entomologist — Call for Special Issues

The Canadian Entomologist (TCE) regularly publishes special issues of manuscripts with a common theme that review or report significant findings of fundamental and (or) general entomological interest. Submissions currently are being solicited for two upcoming special issues. The first of these will be published in 2017 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Biological Survey […]

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Dangerous caterpillars

The following is a guest post by Emma DesPland Last week the CBC contacted me about an “infestation” of caterpillars near a local sports and community centre, citing parents’ concern that these could be dangerous for their children. I was surprised. The pine (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) and oak (T. processionea) processionary caterpillars do have a genuine […]

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Canadian Entomology Research Roundup: September 2015 – January 2016

(version française) As part of a continuing series of Canadian Entomology Research Roundups, here’s what some Canadian entomology grad students have been up to lately: From the authors: Finn Hamilton (University of Victoria) It is now well known that the majority of insects host symbiotic bacteria that have profound consequences for host biology. In some […]

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Rassemblement de la recherche entomologique canadienne: Septembre 2015 – Janvier 2016

(English version here) Cet article fait partie d’une série continue de rassemblement de la recherche entomologique canadienne (Canadian Entomology Research Roundups). Voici ce que les étudiants de cycle supérieur canadiens ont fait récemment: De la part des auteurs: Finn Hamilton (University of Victoria) C’est bien connu que la majorité des insectes sont hôtes à des […]

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The awesomeness of snakeflies

If you are a fan of Canadian neuropteroids, your bucket list should include a trip out west to see one of our best selling points: the Raphidioptera, or snakeflies. The most common of these are in the genus Agulla, and this morning I found several female Agulla when out for a walk at Mt. Tolmie […]

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Are you feeling lucky today? Is it possible to improve your “luck” in academia?

  The following is a guest post by Staffan Lindgren When I was about 10 years old I won a competition in a hobby magazine, which landed me a nice race car track. Since then I have not won anything, really. Yet, I consider myself a lucky person, not only because of a great family […]

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The excavator spider

Guest post by Staffan Lindgren (@bslindgren) The other day I was practicing macro photography (I am still learning after several years of erratic success at best, so please excuse the imperfections) trying to patiently wait out some Halictus sweat bees with my camera. The bees appeared to be much more patient than I was, however, […]

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Musings about statistics by a statistics-phobe

By B. Staffan Lindgren, Professor Emeritus A while back, a paper accepted by The American Statistician entitled “The ASA’s statement on p-values: context, process, and purpose” was posted to the American Statistical Association website. The gist of the paper was that many disciplines rely too much on the p-value as the sole indicator of research […]

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The Cobblestone Tiger Beetle

Dick Vockeroth and the CNC gang

by Mischa Giasson In 2008, l was asked to participate in a mark-release-recapture survey on the shores of Grand Lake, New Brunswick. My dad and I joined Fredericton entomologist Reggie Webster on a boat to visit three small sites among the rocky beaches surrounding the lake. We were searching for a rare, recently locally discovered […]

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The Cuckoo Gypsy Bumble Bee: A Species Endangered

  By Zach DeLong When people hear of endangered species they often think of large and impressive creatures like the Siberian Tiger or Panda Bear, but we often forget about the smaller, yet no less impressive species that need our help as well. The charmingly named Cuckoo Gypsy Bumblebee, or as scientists all it Bombus […]

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